Amaro Nonino is a unique Italian bitter liqueur that’s worth seeking out! It’s bittersweet, with hints of caramel, vanilla and allspice.

Amaro Nonino

Wondering what Amaro Nonino is, and whether it’s worth a place in your liquor cabinet? This unique Italian amaro is hard to find, and a level more expensive than other Italian bitter liqueurs in the same family. Is it worth the purchase? Are there substitutes? What makes it so special? Here’s what you need to know.

What is Amaro Nonino Quintessentia?

Amaro Nonino Quintessentia is a Italian amaro or bitter liqueur (amaro means “little bitter” in Italian). It was invented in 1992 by a distiller named Antonio Nonino in Friuli, Italy. It’s unique because it’s made using grappa, infusing it with herbs, fruits and botanicals. The bittersweet liqueur has flavor notes of gentian, citrus and caramel.

Other Italian amari that are distributed by the Campari Group are easy to find, like Campari, Aperol, Averna, and Cynar. But Amaro Nonino is relatively difficult to find, and it’s more expensive than the other amari.

What does Amaro Nonino taste like?

Amaro Nonino is equally bitter and sweet, with notes of orange, honey, vanilla, licorice, allspice, mango, pepper, and cocoa. It’s got a unique flavor that’s worth seeking out, less sweet than other amari but still easy to drink. It’s at its best served on the rocks as an aperitif or in the popular Paper Plane cocktail. It’s similar to brown amari like Meletti and Cynar, but has a unique flavor due to the grappa.

How much alcohol is in Amaro Nonino? It is 35% ABV (alcohol by volume), so it has a relatively high alcohol content for an amaro. For example, Aperol is the lowest alcohol at 11% ABV, Campari is 24% ABV, and Fernet-Branca is the highest at 40 to 45% ABV (the same level as whiskeyrumvodka and gin).

Are there any Amaro Nonino substitutes? Substitute another dark, herbal and sweet amaro. Some good options include Amaro Averna, Amaro MelettiAmaro Tosolin, or Cynar.

Why we like it

Amaro Nonino is such a balanced amaro, it’s not as sweet as many and even easier to drink, in our opinion. While you can substitute other amari, it’s a fun splurge for the cocktail connoisseur. We love it in a Paper Plane or mixed with soda water. Even better, try the cocktails below.

How much does it cost?

Compared to other liquors, Amaro Nonino is expensive. A 750 ml bottle costs about $50.

Amaro Nonino is great sipped on straight or on the rocks, or you can mix it up into drinks. Don’t want to follow a recipe? Mix it with soda water to create a make-shift spritzer. Or, check out these favorite Amaro Nonino cocktails:

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Amaro Nonino

Paper Plane (Top Amaro Nonino Cocktail!)


  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 0 minutes
  • Total Time: 5 minutes
  • Yield: 1 drink 1x
  • Diet: Vegan

Description

The Paper Plane cocktail is a modern classic that’s a must try! It’s bittersweet and tangy, hitting a magical balance between bourbon and Amaro Nonino.


Ingredients

Scale
  • 1 ounce* bourbon whiskey
  • 1 ounce Aperol
  • 1 ounce Amaro Nonino Quintessentia
  • 1 ounce fresh lemon juice
  • For the garnish: Lemon peel

Instructions

  1. Add the bourbon, Aperol, amaro, and lemon juice to a cocktail shaker. Fill it with ice and shake it until cold.
  2. Strain into a cocktail glass. If desired, garnish with a lemon peel.

Notes

*To convert to tablespoons, 1 ounce = 2 tablespoons

  • Category: Drink
  • Method: Shaken
  • Cuisine: Cocktails

Keywords: Amaro nonino, Amaro nonino quintessentia, Nonino amaro, Amaro nonino cocktails

More cocktail guides

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About the authors

Sonja & Alex

Meet Sonja and Alex Overhiser: Husband and wife. Expert home cooks. Authors of recipes you'll want to make again and again.

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