Amaretto Whiskey Sour

This amaretto whiskey sour combines the best of these two classic cocktails! The blend of two liquors makes a perfectly balanced drink.

Amaretto whiskey sour

Love a good whiskey sour and amaretto sour? Here’s the next best thing: combine them and make an Amaretto Whiskey Sour! Yes, this drink uses equal parts of these two liquors to make something new and altogether delicious. We’re huge fans of both drinks around here, and this one is notable. It’s even more balanced in flavor, making magic with the nuttiness of the amaretto with the spicy vanilla notes of the bourbon. If you’re a sour fan: hold onto your hats!

What’s in an amaretto whiskey sour?

This Amaretto Whiskey Sour is a combination of two classic drinks. The Whiskey Sour is an iconic drink that goes back centuries: the earliest mention of the drink was in the 1870’s! It’s on the list of International Bartender Association’s IBA official cocktails, meaning it has an official definition. The Amaretto Sour is a very popular spin on the whiskey sour using Italian amaretto liqueur. This recipe simply increases the quantity of bourbon from our amaretto sour to make an entirely new drink! Here’s what you’ll need:

  • Amaretto (Italian almond liqueur)
  • Bourbon whiskey
  • Lemon juice
  • Simple syrup or maple syrup
  • Egg white (optional)
Amaretto whiskey sour

Egg white is optional, but classic

Now, you don’t have to make an amaretto whiskey sour with an egg white: but we highly recommend it! Bartenders have been adding egg whites to cocktails since the 1860’s. The texture and flavor that an egg white adds can’t be beat! Why? Two things; an egg white adds:

  • Frothy texture to the surface of the drink, making it more fun to drink
  • A creamy rich flavor, making it taste more delicious

If you’re worried about the safety of raw egg whites in cocktails, the risk of salmonella is very low. In fact: melons, salad, and peanuts, have more of a threat for salmonella than eggs! Here’s how to safely store and use eggs to minimize risk (via Food & Wine).

How to make an amaretto whiskey sour (basic steps)

The amaretto whiskey sour is just as easy as either of the two sour cocktails of its namesake. Here’s what to do:

  1. Place all ingredients in a cocktail shaker. Shake for 15 seconds without ice.
  2. Add ice to the cocktail shaker and shake again for 30 seconds.
  3. Strain into a glass and garnish. Voila!

The technique above is a called a Dry Shake. The dry shake agitates the egg white in the cocktail shaker so that it forms the beautifully frothy foam topping. If you’re not using an egg white, you can skip the shaking without ice and just shake it up like a normal cocktail.

Amaretto

More about amaretto

Amaretto is an almond liqueur that originates from Italy. It tastes both sweet and bitter (amaretto means in Italian “little bitter”). You may know the flavor from the popular amaretto cookies, a popular Italian sweet. It’s worth getting a bottle for your shelf: you can try more amaretto cocktails like the Italian MargaritaGodfather, or French Connection.

Best whiskey for an amaretto whiskey sour

You can use any type of whiskey for an amaretto whiskey sour! We prefer it with bourbon, but anything works! Our mantra is that a drink is only as high quality as the liquor. Try for something in the mid-priced range. However in this case, amaretto does help to cover over a sub-par whiskey: so it’s a drink where liquor quality is less important (versus something like an Old Fashioned).

  • Bourbon: Our top pick! The sweet flavor of bourbon whiskey is ideal
  • Jameson Irish whiskey: Jameson is very mild and makes for an even more balanced drink
  • Rye whiskey: If you’re a whiskey fan, you’ll enjoy the spicy finish of rye whiskey
Amaretto whiskey sour

Love sour cocktails?

There are so many ways to drink a sour: just vary the liquor! Here are some favorites:

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Amaretto whiskey sour

Amaretto Whiskey Sour


1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (7 votes, average: 4.71 out of 5)

  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 0 minutes
  • Total Time: 5 minutes
  • Yield: 1 drink 1x
  • Diet: Vegetarian

Description

This amaretto whiskey sour combines the best of these two classic cocktails! The blend of two liquors makes a perfectly balanced drink.


Ingredients

Scale
  • 1 ounce (2 tablespoons) amaretto
  • 2 ounces (4 tablespoons) bourbon whiskey
  • 1 ounce (2 tablespoons) lemon juice
  • 1/2 ounce (1 tablespoon) simple syrup 
  • 1 egg white (optional)
  • For the garnish: Cocktail cherry or Luxardo cherry

Instructions

  1. Add the amaretto, bourbon, lemon juice, syrup, egg white, and to a cocktail shaker without ice. Shake for 15 seconds (skip this first step if you’re not using the egg white).
  2. Add the ice to the cocktail shaker. Shake again for 30 seconds.
  3. Strain the drink into a glass; the foam will collect at the top. Garnish with a cocktail cherry.
  • Category: Drink
  • Method: Shaken
  • Cuisine: Cocktail

Keywords: Amaretto whiskey sour

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About the Authors

Sonja Overhiser

Cookbook Author and writer

Sonja Overhiser is author of Pretty Simple Cooking, named one of the best healthy cookbooks of 2018. She’s host of the food podcast Small Bites and founder of the food blog A Couple Cooks. Featured from the TODAY Show to Bon Appetit, Sonja seeks to inspire adventurous eating to make the world a better place one bite at a time.

Alex Overhiser

Cookbook Author and photographer

Alex Overhiser is an acclaimed food photographer and author based in Indianapolis. He’s host of the food podcast Small Bites and founder of the recipe website A Couple Cooks. Featured from the TODAY Show to Bon Appetit, Alex is author of Pretty Simple Cooking, named one of the best vegetarian cookbooks by Epicurious.

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