Angel Food Cupcakes

These angel food cupcakes are a mini version of the traditional cake and impossibly light and airy, a tasty dessert that’s a total crowd pleaser.

Angel food cupcakes

This post was created in partnership with Roxbury Mountain Maple. All opinions are our own. 

Recently I had the honor of interviewing Tanorria Askew, a finalist on the popular cooking competition show, MasterChef. When she got “the call”, she phoned her mom from the breakroom at her desk job, crying. At the filming in LA, she had her makeup done daily by Emmy award-winning makeup artists and Gordon Ramsey critiqued her shrimp and grits. But what impressed me most about Tanorria was the way she views food. “Food is community,” she said. “I cook to make friends.” And by friends, she means people of all shapes, sizes, and colors. This woman loves all people. She hosts dinners for women to discuss the deep racial tensions permeating our country while eating the same, soul-nourishing food around the table. Keep reading for more on food as community, and this angel food cupcakes recipe.

Angel food cupcakes

Food as community

Before I became interested in food 10 years ago, my narrative was food as chore: calories in, calories out, simple as that. Later, I graduated to food as nourishment, where eating “healthy” was the top priority. Eating this way was better, but it left little space for food as community. Since I was most focused on healthy, it was difficult to participate in a society where it’s natural to bring cookies to new neighbors or make a plate of cupcakes for the family barbecue.

In that vein, these angel food cupcakes with maple cream are a recipe for food as community. They’re a lighter option than the typical cupcake and could be considered a healthy dessert, so they touch on food as nourishment too. But let’s be honest: they’re made with lots of sugar, so sugar + air still = sugar. But there are a few things that make these angel food cupcakes closer to a healthy dessert.

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Angel food cupcakes

Making angel food cupcakes

Here are a few features of these angel food cupcakes that make them a deliciously healthier dessert:

  • Angel food cake has no butter or oil like the typical cake; it’s made of flour, egg whites, and sugar.
  • The angel food cupcakes serving size and sugar content is lower than the typical angel food cake.
  • We’ve replaced a portion of the granulated sugar in a typical angel food cake with maple syrup, a natural sugar. Though maple syrup still contains sugar, but it’s a naturally-occurring, minimally processed ingredient.
  • For the frosting, we’ve used maple cream, maple syrup that’s been condensed into a creamy, spreadable form (same notes as sugar vs. maple syrup, as above). You could also use our Homemade Whipped Cream or Yogurt Whipped Cream.

These angel food cupcakes have been through a few recipe tests and consensus is that they’re light, fluffy and uniquely maple flavored: a lovely healthy dessert to reflect food as community.

Maple cream from Roxbury Mountain Maple

About the maple cream

The maple cream we used is from Roxbury Mountain Maple, a New York-based family business. They’ve found that it’s a versatile and interesting ingredient that they’ve started to sell along with their maple syrup. They’re starting to become known for the stuff, and we find the creamy pure maple spread is very, very good. In this recipe, we’ve used the Golden and Delicate maple cream, which imparts a maple flavor without being overwhelming. It’s worth purchasing a jar, for this recipe or just for spreading on toast or dipping fruit. (Or, swirl a tiny drizzle in your coffee as Ben from Roxbury suggested on our podcast a few months ago.) If you do use this maple cream, make sure to spread just a thin layer; a little goes a long way.

About the company: Roxbury Mountain Maple is a family business based in the Catskills of New York that produces all-natural, organic maple syrup and maple cream. Supporting Roxbury Mountain Maple promotes family farms, local community, sustainable farming, forest preservation, and your health. For more about the company, see the Roxbury Mountain Maple website.

Angel food cupcakes

Looking for maple syrup recipes?

These angel food cupcakes with maple cream are one of our favorite maple syrup recipes to date. If you’re looking for other maple syrup recipes or recipes with maple cream, here are a few we recommend:

Looking for healthy dessert recipes?

A few more healthy dessert recipes:

Did you make this recipe?

If you make these angel food cupcakes with maple cream, we’d love to hear how they turned out. Leave a comment below or share a picture on Instagram and mention @acouplecooks.

This angel food cupcakes recipe is…

Vegetarian.

Print
Maple Cream Angel Food Cupcakes | A Couple Cooks

Angel Food Cupcakes


1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (2 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

  • Author: a Couple Cooks
  • Prep Time: 35 minutes
  • Cook Time: 25 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour 45 minutes
  • Yield: 12 1x

Description

These angel food cupcakes are a mini version of the traditional cake and impossibly light and airy, a tasty dessert that’s a total crowd pleaser.


Scale

Ingredients

For the cupcakes

  • 8 egg whites (from large eggs)
  • 2 tablespoons powdered sugar
  • 2/3 cup cake flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 1/2 teaspoon orange extract
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar

For the topping


Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 325°F. Lightly grease a muffin pan with baking spray. On a counter, set two bowls apart the width of the muffin pan, then test setting the muffin pan upside down and on top of the bowls (this will be used for cooling the cupcakes after baking).
  2. Separate the egg whites and let them stand to come to room temperature.
  3. In a medium bowl, whisk together the powdered sugar and cake flour.
  4. In the bowl of a stand mixer, mix the egg whites, water, orange extract, maple syrup and cream of tartar. (You can also use a large non-reactive bowl and a hand mixer.) Mix on low speed until the mixture is foamy, then turn up to medium speed and gradually begin to add the granulated sugar, about 1 tablespoon at a time, over a period of 2 to 3 minutes. After all the sugar is added, turn up the speed to high and beat until medium peaks form, about 2 to 3 minutes. The mixture should be modestly glossy and the tips of peaks formed when you dip your finger into the mixture should flop over a bit.
  5. Remove the bowl from the mixer, and using a fine mesh strainer, sift in half of the dry ingredients. Gently fold the dry ingredients into the egg mixture with a spatula. Then sift and fold in the remaining dry ingredients.
  6. Using a 1/2 cup measure and a spatula, spoon the batter into 12 muffin cups. The batter is very fluffy and will rise significantly over the top of the muffin tin. If desired, gently smooth out the tops of the cupcakes, taking care not to deflate the airy batter.
  7. Bake for about 20 minutes or until the tops are slightly golden and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Remove the tin from the oven and allow to cool in the pan for 5 minutes. Then, set the pan upside down between the two bowls until fully cooled, about 45 minutes.
  8. When ready to serve, remove the cakes from the pan (you may need to use a sharp knife to release the edges from the pan). Spread the top of each cupcake with a very thin layer of maple cream. Slice raspberries in half, then place them cut side down on the top of the iced angel food cupcakes. Serve immediately. (The cakes are best eaten the day of baking. If desired, you can bake and freeze the cakes by wrapping them in plastic wrap and placing in a sealed plastic bag; however, this can slightly deflate the cakes. We tried this and they tasted nearly as good after freezing; however, eating the day of is the preferred option.)

  • Category: Dessert
  • Method: Baked
  • Cuisine: American

Keywords: Angel Food Cupcakes, Cupcakes Recipe, Summer Dessert Recipes, Fruit Desserts, Berry Desserts, Healthy Desserts

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About the Authors

Sonja Overhiser

Cookbook Author and writer

Sonja Overhiser is author of Pretty Simple Cooking, named one of the best healthy cookbooks of 2018. She’s host of the food podcast Small Bites and founder of the food blog A Couple Cooks. Featured from the TODAY Show to Bon Appetit, Sonja seeks to inspire adventurous eating to make the world a better place one bite at a time.

Alex Overhiser

Cookbook Author and photographer

Alex Overhiser is an acclaimed food photographer and author based in Indianapolis. He’s host of the food podcast Small Bites and founder of the recipe website A Couple Cooks. Featured from the TODAY Show to Bon Appetit, Alex is author of Pretty Simple Cooking, named one of the best vegetarian cookbooks by Epicurious.

8 Comments

  • Reply
    Rochelle
    June 26, 2017 at 10:37 pm

    I made these for a dinner party and they were a HUGE hit. Everyone had seconds! Love the maple cream, it’s sweet and rich against the fluffy texture of the angel food cake. Wonderful combo. These cupcakes didn’t last long at all. ;)

    • Reply
      Sonja
      July 26, 2017 at 6:14 pm

      Oh, I’m so glad to hear this, Rochelle! Thank you so much for making them!

  • Reply
    Brittany
    June 27, 2017 at 6:08 pm

    Hi Sonja,
    Have you considered making these with almond flour to add extra nutrients? I have an angel food cake recipe using almond flour and cardomom that is super tasty…not individual cupcakes and it doesn’t use maple syrup as a sweetener…so a bit different, but a similar concept!

    • Reply
      Sonja
      July 26, 2017 at 6:12 pm

      Thanks for this idea! I’d love to see your recipe for this! I would think almond flour would make it dense, but it sounds like yours stays light and fluffy! Feel free to forward it on if you have the chance!

  • Reply
    Genevieve Crum
    June 28, 2017 at 2:39 am

    Dear Sonja,

    I read this paragraph and I just want to tell you how deeply I resonated with your words:

    “Before I became interested in food 10 years ago, my narrative was food as chore: calories in, calories out, simple as that. Later, I graduated to food as nourishment, where eating “healthy” was the top priority. Eating this way was better, but it left little space for food as community. Since I was most focused on healthy, it was difficult to participate in a society where it’s natural to bring cookies to new neighbors or make a plate of cupcakes for the family barbecue.”

    For me, food will always be synonymous with community, and I think that is where the real power of food lies: As a natural and powerful way of building community and connections with others from the farmers who grew it to the people around your dinner table. Thank you for continuing to inspire me and your many readers on a daily basis, and for sharing such an important message!

    Genevieve

    • Reply
      Sonja
      July 26, 2017 at 6:11 pm

      Genevieve, thank you for this very thoughtful comment! The power of food to build community is one of the biggest reasons we do what we do. Thank YOU for your passion!

  • Reply
    Ginger by Choice I Food & Lifestyle Blog
    July 4, 2017 at 8:20 pm

    I love the idea of food as community. I always bake something or make jam to have a little gift to say thank you or welcome! Thanks for sharing the recipe, I’ll definitely try your beautiful little Angel Food Cupcakes …

    Ginger by Choice I Food & Lifestyle Blog

    • Reply
      Sonja
      July 26, 2017 at 6:06 pm

      That’s so sweet of you! I love the idea of jam as an alternative to a cookie or cake. Thanks for commenting!

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